1. Helping the Impaired Physician: A Program for Colleagues

    Physicians have ready access to a wide range of narcotic drugs and other controlled substances. Despite their professional training and knowledge of the problems associated with these drugs, physicians and other healthcare professionals are not immune to the risk of addiction. According to one estimate, as many as 17,000 U.S. physicians may have substance abuse problems at one time.

    Anesthesiologists and family physicians appear to be at particular risk; residents in emergency medicine, psychiatry and anesthesiology may also have higher than average rates of addiction. Substance abuse by physicians can destroy lives, families, and professional careers. Their errors can cause irreparable harm to their patients, and their colleagues and employers could be held jointly liable.

    Despite this grim picture, with early detection, intervention, and effective treatment, more than eighty percent of impaired physicians can recover. This provocative training program is designed to help colleagues and employers of impaired physicians (as well as impaired physicians themselves) to recognize substance abuse problems, and to take prompt and effective action. The program is hosted by CBC medical journalist Dr. Brian Goldman, MD, FACEP, MCFP(EM).

    Reviews

    "Issues related to pain management, substance abuse and drug diversion have become increasingly important within the health professions in the last decade. Each video emphasizes the importance of and the process for professional intervention for the impaired physician or pharmacist.

    Recommended
    - Educational Media Reviews Online

    Awards: Gold Plaque, Chicago Intercom Competition

    Jim Brodie Producer/Editor

    For other videos in this series go to:
    vimeopro.com/ontario/drug-diversion-and-intervention

  2. Preventing Drug Diversion: A Program for Physicians

    Today's powerful new pain medications offer patients more effective and convenient relief of pain than has ever been available before. But many of these medicines, including both opioid and non-opioid analgesics, are sought by addicts and "recreational" users as well. Physicians, nurses, and other healthcare staff may have difficulty distinguishing con artists and drug abusers from legitimate patients. Federal and state regulations, and their own professional ethics, place an increasing burden on clinicians to prevent diversion of drugs into the illegal market.

    This engaging training film will help physicians and other learn to prevent drug diversion and to comply with current legal requirements without unduly increasing costs or, more importantly, compromising patient care. A Study Guide supplementing the video is available online. The program is hosted by CBC medical journalist Dr. Brian Goldman, MD, FACEP, MCFP(EM).

    The program won a gold plaque at the Chicago Intercom Festival and was a short-list finalist at the American Medical Association Film Awards.

    Reviews
    "Issues related to pain management, substance abuse and drug diversion have become increasingly important within the health professions in the last decade. Each video emphasizes the importance of and the process for professional intervention for the impaired physician or pharmacist. Recommended." --Educational Media Reviews Online

  3. Pain Management or Drug Abuse? A Program for Law Enforcers

    Law enforcement officers play a key role in minimizing the diversion of narcotic drugs into the illegal street market. Yet no investigator wants to do anything that would prevent controlled drugs from reaching those who truly need them. It's a difficult balancing act.

    New guidelines for treating severe and chronic pain call for doses of opioid medications considerably higher than used in the past, which has made the investigators' dilemma even tougher.

    With larger doses of opioids being regularly prescribed, how can investigators distinguish between legitimate patients and drug seekers? How can they tell the competent physician from the 'script doctor?' What about pharmacists who dispense large quantities of opioids?

    This engaging educational program will provide drug diversion investigators with practical tips and guidelines that will help them distinguish between legitimate medical practice and behavior that warrants an investigation. A Study Guide supplementing the video is included.

    It was written by Brian Goldman, MD, FACEP, MCFP(EM), in consultation with Ronald W. Buzzeo, RPh, former Deputy Director, Office of Diversion Control, USDEA.

    The program was shot in Baltimore, Salt Lake City and Toronto.

  4. Preventing Drug Diversion: A Program for Pharmacists

    Today's powerful new pain medications offer patients more effective and convenient relief of pain than has ever been available before. But many of these medicines, including both opioid and non-opioid analgesics, are sought by addicts and "recreational" users as well.

    Pharmacists may have difficulty distinguishing con artists and drug abusers from legitimate patients. Federal and state regulations, and their own professional ethics, place an increasing burden on pharmacists to prevent diversion of drugs into the illegal market.

    This engaging training film will help pharmacists learn to prevent drug diversion and to comply with current legal requirements without unduly increasing costs or, more importantly, compromising patient care.

    Awarded Gold Plaque, Chicago Intercom Competition

  5. Thwarting the Illicit Drug Seeker: A Program for Dentists

    Pain management is a cornerstone of modern dentistry. Among its growing arsenal of pain minimizing techniques are opioid analgesics and minor tranquilizers to relieve anxiety. Unfortunately many of these medications are sought by addicts and "recreational" users as well. Diversion of drugs from legitimate sources into the illegal street market is a growing problem. Dentists and their staff may have difficulty distinguishing con artists and drug abusers from legitimate patients. This comprehensive training package offers every dentist a set of simple steps that can help diminish the availability of controlled drugs on the street, without increasing costs or compromising patient care. The program is hosted by CBC medical journalist Dr. Brian Goldman, MD, FACEP, MCFP(EM).

    Awarded: Hugo Award, Chicago Intercom Competition

  6. Helping the Impaired Pharmacist: A program for colleagues

    Pharmacists have ready access to a wide range of narcotic drugs and other controlled substances. Despite their professional training and knowledge of the risks associated with these drugs, research indicates that pharmacists may be at particular risk for substance abuse.

    Some studies have suggested that as many as 10 to 18 percent may be chemically dependent, and even higher percentages of practicing and student pharmacists report using controlled substances without prescriptions. Substance abuse by pharmacists can destroy lives, families, and professional careers.

    Their errors can cause irreparable harm to their patients, and their colleagues and employers could be held jointly liable. Despite this grim picture, with early detection, intervention, and effective treatment, more than three quarters of impaired pharmacists recover.

    This provocative training program is designed to help pharmacists and employers to recognize substance abuse problems among their colleagues, and to take prompt and effective action. The program is hosted by CBC medical journalist Dr. Brian Goldman, MD, FACEP, MCFP(EM).