Why a Mantra? Mantras can be either a civic or a spiritual practice and sidestep some the inevitable issues involved in current meme wars, othering and violence, and the lingering hopelessness resulting from headlines, blogposts, sermons, videos, social media posts, hashtags as well as the permeating pain of black anger, white guilt, vigils, protests, walks, marches and gatherings of solidarity.
Mantras require no adherent qualifications, no belief system to assent to, and no other requirements other than the commitment to practice and see what happens. That’s it.
For more information check out The Sowers of Justice Network
sowersofjusticenetwork.org

  1. Introduction To The Mantras

    What we hope will happen...
    Progressive people of faith and people of good will seek to add value to relationships and the common good in ways that manifest themselves in legitimate impact on social problems and situations. These mantras help us focus on our values in practical, hopeful, instrumental ways and offers the nonreligious a practice we can all join.

  2. Instructions on how to approach and apply the mantras.

    Mantras are used as phrases that are repeated and repeated and repeated as anchors for our wandering minds and to help sow, root, and grow important values and actions into daily practice. Mantras are the repetition of words and phrases of special significance, and can be said either out loud or internally or both. Progressive people of faith and people of good will seek to add value to relationships and the common good in ways that manifest themselves in legitimate impact on social problems and situations. These mantras help us focus on our values in practical, hopeful, instrumental ways and offers the nonreligious a practice we can all join.

  3. Mantra ONE: I will meet people in ways that matter and I will put myself in places I might not otherwise go

    I will offer friendship, time, listening, and a learner’s posture.
    The difference is between showing up for racial justice generically or reluctantly because of ignorance, peer pressure, self-aggrandizing do-goodery, or personal values incongruence and instead, living for and living with and listening both to people and places you know and those you intend to know personally but may not know yet, including those at the same place of learning and yearning, those further along in the work and in understanding of systemic racism, and the people of color you want to serve, and with permission, being in spaces that are not primarily white spaces.

  4. Mantra TWO: I will end my own racisms

    Before I attempt to engage others in the work of racial justice or pointing out any racism of others or goading racists into (even more) vitriolic responses to the truth about race in America.

    The difference is between merely naming racism and pointing out others’ racism, or looking for symptoms to fix But instead to personally take inventory about my racism and living a commitment to uproot racism in every day practice,

  5. Mantra THREE: i will put my money where my mouth is

    I will offer connections, money, and other resources as reparations and invest in changing conditions as repayment of debt, not as charity.) The difference is between ‘giving back’ and, instead, giving what you owe as reparations.

  6. Mantra FOUR: I Will Give Up Old Commitments

    I will give up old commitments (in order to take on the new commitment to grow the cause of uprooting racism) The difference is between squeezing racial justice into space occupied by other world views, causes and commitments and instead thoughtfully, realistically making way for racial justice to grow and inhabit my everyday life more fully.