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Audiovisual FILM STUDIES FOR FREE

Selected Videographic Essays and Criticism by Catherine Grant

TENBMOVIES

This was a scholarly experiment in compilationism. Honest.* Ten favourite clips from ten of my favourite (colour) movies whose titles begin with a B. They come in alphabetical order, accompanied by music from another B-initialled movie as a bonus. All the sequences were snippetted and captured in very low res online versions, so the frames are mostly cropped and their motion is distorted. Thank you Cristina Álvarez López for the compelling suggestion!

This experiment has now become a public game/challenge for the Audiovisualcy group of film scholars and critics with the following rules:
"Announcing the "Ten Favorite Films Beginning with the Letter..." video game! The rules: please request a letter in the comments below [facebook.com/Audiovisualcy/posts/691452417579643], and edit together very short sequences from your ten favorite films beginning with the allocated letter. Feel free to use a soundtrack excerpt from another film beginning with that letter. Keep the whole thing well under 5 minutes. Credit all your sources. Share a link to your video in the comments. The Fair Use/Dealing context is that of experimental compilationism. Some scholars/critics say they don't make film studies video essays because of the pressure of having to "argue something discursively" in audiovisual forms. Film scholars, why not just create an "audiovisual argument" in favor of associative connection by joining up movie sequences you already know and love? In this way, you might get to explore, indeed to *feel*, if you haven't before, one of the biggest advantages, and tools, of videographic film studies: compilation."

See facebook.com/Audiovisualcy/posts/691452417579643

As film scholar Rob Stone wrote about his video for this game (on favourite films beginning with M: vimeo.com/90757957): "Apart from the fun of actually compiling and editing something, this is a great exercise in realising aural and visual associations and making new connections, like creating synaptic links between films that might never have met otherwise."

*[See Sjöberg, Patrik. 2001. The World in Pieces: A Study of Compilation Film. Stockholm: Aura Forlag.]