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  1. superfícies - peter (tubo) (Alberte Pagán, 2015)

    Where does the image come from? From the inside or from the outside? Is it broadcast light or reflected light? Is it TV or cinema?
    Image and voice recorded during an interview with Kubelka at the (S8) Mostra de Cinema Periférico in 2012, the year of the “death of cinema”, as the Austrian filmmaker put it. His face was projected on the dead surface of a picture tube and then refilmed from that surface, which was never designed as a projection screen, but to receive the image from the inside. This contradiction between screened image and broadcast image is the contradiction between celluloid cinema and digital cinema. Life (heartbeats) and death (worms).

  2. Konfrontationen 2014 (Alberte Pagán, 2015)

    A film by Alberte Pagán commissioned by Philipp Schmickl & Hans Falb.

    Konfrontationen is one of the oldest festivals for free and improvised music in Europe. It takes place in Nickelsdorf, Austria, on the border with Hungary, where Syrian refugees are not allowed to continue on their trip through Europe.

    This is a film about the 2014 festival — twenty performances where sight and sound don’t always go hand in hand, where the image confronts the sound and the sound escapes the image. A musical in which workers and audiences are as important and necessary as musicians.

    more info: albertepagan.eu/cinema/filmografia/konfrontationen-2014/

  3. A Fundamental Error (Alberte Pagán, 2016)

    Curtocircuito Film Festival 2016 (CAMIRA Jury Special Mention)
    Images Contre Nature (Marseille) 2017
    Belo Horizonte Film Festival 2017

    Where does the materiality of digital cinema lie? In its hexadecimal code. It is possible to “materially” manipulate a digital film by messing with its ciphers and letters, in the same way as we can manipulate celluloid (or polyester) by scratching, painting or applying bleach onto its emulsion.

    But the resulting images are volatile: we must fix them if we want to stop an unpredictable evolution. In analogue cinema, besides the wear of the film in the projector, the chemicals one may use to abstract the picture keep working at the emulsion; the leaves of grass you may glue to the film will eventually rot. You must make a print of your film if you want to stop deterioration.

    We can get into the “emulsion” of digital cinema (different from video, as its magnetic tape could be physically manipulated) by accessing its hexadecimal code. The resulting images are equally volatile: depending on the video player we may use, the results will be different; the same video player will never offer us the same images when reading the same data for a second time.

    This is due to the fact that the images our manipulation produces are not “effects” but “glitches” or “errors”. Video players have to deal with them as best as they can. To “fix” the film you must make a screen capture. (A copy of the original file is not enough, as it would keep the same “glitches”: you must “fix” the errors so that they become aesthetic options.) Aestheticized digital noise.

    A Fundamental Error is a retake on my portrait of Kubelka Surfaces - Peter (tube), in which I reshot his face off a tube screen. Here I delve into its hexadecimal code so that it degenerates even further. The champion of analogue cinema, the meticulous montage artist, thus becomes an utterly unpredictable dance of digits and codes.

    more info: albertepagan.eu/cinema/filmografia/erros/

  4. Noite de rodos (Alberte Pagán, 2016)

    Where does the materiality of digital cinema lie? In its hexadecimal code. It is possible to “materially” manipulate a digital film by messing with its ciphers and letters, in the same way as we can manipulate celluloid (or polyester) by scratching, painting or applying bleach onto its emulsion.

    But the resulting images are volatile: we must fix them if we want to stop an unpredictable evolution. In analogue cinema, besides the wear of the film in the projector, the chemicals one may use to abstract the picture keep working at the emulsion; the leaves of grass you may glue to the film will eventually rot. You must make a print of your film if you want to stop deterioration.

    We can get into the “emulsion” of digital cinema (different from video, as its magnetic tape could be physically manipulated) by accessing its hexadecimal code. The resulting images are equally volatile: depending on the video player we may use, the results will be different; the same video player will never offer us the same images when reading the same data for a second time.

    This is due to the fact that the images our manipulation produces are not “effects” but “glitches” or “errors”. Video players have to deal with them as best as they can. To “fix” the film you must make a screen capture. (A copy of the original file is not enough, as it would keep the same “glitches”: you must “fix” the errors so that they become aesthetic options.) Aestheticized digital noise.

    A Fundamental Error is a retake on my portrait of Kubelka Surfaces - Peter (tube), in which I reshot his face off a tube screen. Here I delve into its hexadecimal code so that it degenerates even further. The champion of analogue cinema, the meticulous montage artist, thus becomes an utterly unpredictable dance of digits and codes.
    The images for Night of Hoes come from the Konfrontationen festival in 2014. The music on the left channel was recorded on the night of hoes (Monday of Carnival) in Paços de Arenteiro. The music on the right channel belongs to Polwechsel. As for the sound, primitivism and avant-garde go hand in hand. As for the image, the manipulation of its hexadecimal code produces unpredictable and disturbing images.

    more info: albertepagan.eu/cinema/filmografia/erros/

  5. superfícies - nyaungshwe (pel) (Alberte Pagán, 2016)

    Outtakes of A Pedra do Lobo. Susa Espinheira projected onto herself. Boats travelling the Nyaungshwe canal in Myanmar make up the soundscape.

    More info: albertepagan.eu/cinema/filmografia/superficies/

  6. superfícies - pagán (piçarra) (Alberte Pagán, 2016)

    Overhead shot of the plains of Pagan (Bagan, Myanmar). Soundscape: ships travelling the Irrawaddy River (Ayeyarwady) River on their way to Pagan.

    more info: albertepagan.eu/cinema/filmografia/superficies/